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We’ve created our own monster – it’s called talent | Welcome and General | ConnectedCoaches

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Home » Groups » Welcome and General » blogs » Dan Cottrell » We’ve created our own monster – it’s called talent
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Steve Symonds, Jim Hayter and 4 others like this.
 

Comments (6)

  
andrewb62
Andrew Beaven said:

Great post, Dan, and a very important issue.
But is it "talent" that is the millstone, or the talent pathway? The idea that talent will be fulfilled if the athlete "follows the way"?
I work mostly with groups of children at the ignition/early participation stage - they play for fun, to be with their friends - but also with a few individuals with an eye on that talent pathway.
One of the latter, undoubtedly talented and with potential to become an even better player, has just been invited to join the County "performance" squad. Access to more experienced, better qualified coaches, to technical innovation, S&C and lifestyle support.

She is just 12 years old.
Will she still be enjoying the game in four years?

12/10/16
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 · Sion Kitson likes this.
 
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skitson
Sion Kitson said:

A really well written post Dan. Certainly has got me thinking about my own practices. The question that is going around my head is what is our role as a coach at each level of the pathway and how far or how much should coaches be involved when it comes to supporting athletes towards their goals or helping them make it to the next level? We all want to see those we coach reach their goals and aspire to be the best they can be but at what expense. Interestingly with World Mental Health Day just a few days ago I do believe their is a gap in coach development to up skill the workforce to provide athletes with greater lifestyle and emotional support training. I know mental health awareness training and workshops that look at the personality and mind-set of athletes is out there but application of these skills in the role of a counsellor effectively is perhaps not that prevalent thus I would love to hear from coaches within sports who feel their governing body has already recognised some of the aspects of Dan's blog and are beginning to alter the way they do things? A good lunchtime read. Cheers.

13/10/16
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Ralph
Ralph Samwell said:

How depressing.
For me has always been simple.
Did you choose the game or did the game choose you?
Ask any kid and it’s either, parents, coach or social conformity that decides whether they take up the sport.
Now all that has to happen is any talent constraints and a brick wall is hit.
The reason there are so many types of sports, is because there are so many types of human.
Each human fitting physically, and psychologically into the sport or not.
Just because they seemed to not have talent for their chosen sport, doesn’t necessarily mean they don’t have any talent.
Just as there is a life partner our there for pretty much everyone, there’s also a sport that will suit us.
If you’re lucky enough to find it, job done.
If you’re unlucky enough to be pushed into the wrong sport, you hit the talent wall.
Given enough freedom, the child will pick the right sport because the sport will choose the child.

13/10/16
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 · Deborah Danks likes this.
 
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TrampDeb
Deborah Danks said:

Talent is one thing and its not an item.. You have to consider the whole package of which most of it has baggage to include psychological, parent and environment. The talent is the easy bit. That I'm sure we know how to hone and improve. We can all look at how a body moves and detect which bit should be doing what. I bet most of us watch other sports and automatically watch how the body moves and offer opinion of what bit isn't working well enough. The mental mountain is the one that is the hardest to climb. So many uphill battles. Good days and bad days of which is all down to what mindset they are in. I've become a very good psychologist - however, its only works if they want it too.

10/11/16
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SteveRuis
Steve Ruis said:

I think we are deluding ourselves. What is this thing we think we know of as "talent?" Basically we call anyone with a modicum of proficiency "talented," as if they were not responsible for their own capabilities. (I avoid the term "talent" because it allows an athelete to believe that their proficiency comes from somewhere outside of them.) Sure everyone has genetic propensities and physical abilities but not all tall people like basketball, nor do those with fast hands want to be boxers. So, what keeps us on an improvement path? I suggest that improvement is a big part of that, why would anyone keep trying if they are getting worse or staying the same (even though some do, most do not). So, their labors have to bear some fruit. There is something else, though, and that proficiency needs to feel some psychological need. Most coaches would prefer that the joy of performing be that major need, but as a teach of many decades, I found students motivated by the joy of learning were few and far between. Some of these psychological motivations can be quite negative. I suggest that if they are not positive, that student will not be in that sport for long. Why "recreate" a negative mood or feeling?

14/11/16
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Ralph
Ralph Samwell said:

better words than talent, for me, would be,
capability and or ability and or proficiency,
because those three words have physiological, architectural, or neurological limits; they are finite, whereas talent is a vague, complex of many competing factors.

14/11/16
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