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Growth Mindsets in Coaching | Welcome and General | ConnectedCoaches

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Andy Edwards, Andrew Beaven and 2 others like this.
 

Comments (7)

  
joew
Joe whelehan said:

I like the idea of adding "yet"...a very powerful tool to bring people back to reality and consider what they can achieve. In a similar vein, I'd also suggest that replacing "but" with "and" when discussing can be another useful hack. It can help turn a potentially challenging situation into a joint effort, such as when offering criticism - eg. "You're playing pretty well and I think now is the time to take it up a notch" comes across better than "You're playing pretty well but we need...."

20 days ago
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disco_blue

Another, easy way of getting a feeling of what it is like to be a learner, is to do a variation of your sport, giving yourself a challenge. For example, for tennis or curling or darts you could use your other hand, and feel the sensation of undeveloped coordination. We coach blind bowlers, so it is good to spend time to practice blindfolded to experience what they go through. An obvious side benefit is you can eventually demonstrate techniques using either hand.

20 days ago
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 · Rebekkah Chiam likes this.
 
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andrewb62
Andrew Beaven said:

Switch hands - good call! I can now bowl (but not throw) left-handed. Good for coaching left handers, but also when “mirroring” an action.

16 days ago
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BMXcoach

Great idea, Ian. I sometimes challenge riders (BMX racing) to use the non dominant foot forward in gate starts and even closing their eyes when balancing in the gate. Must admit I haven't tried closing my eyes and will do so next opportunity!

15 days ago
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disco_blue

Can you explain "mirroring action"?

14 days ago
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andrewb62
Andrew Beaven said:

When demonstrating a ‘side-on” activity (most cricket skills) it can be helpful to have the player facing the coach, and simultaneously “mirroring” his actions - “front arm does this, back leg does that” - rather than demo-ing then expecting the player to copy afterwards, or demo-ing but with the coach’s back to the player.
Sometimes mirroring helps the player, sometimes it only confuses...I find it helps me.

14 days ago
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AaronVirieux
Aaron Virieux said:

Have to admit first I am a Carol Dweck fan! I really like the Yet... I think it is an easy,non threatening add on to any negative self talk you hear. I also know I am often guilty of using the word talent, but particularly when working with squads of juniors trying to make state teams etc. I like to remind them that Talent may have got them into the squad, but now they are surrounded by other athletes with the same talent, that talent can't be relied upon to make the next level.

18 days ago
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andrewb62
Andrew Beaven said:

“...do we always model the same attitude to learning and growth that we want those we coach to take up?”

Coach as (learning) role model is often overlooked. I try to make a point of mentioning my CPD to the players I work with - not to justify putting up my hourly rates (no increase since 2014...) but to emphasise the growth mindset approach.

I was challenged once — “but don’t you know how to coach, yet?” — but that just gave the opportunity to point out how my (new) knowledge might help the player.

16 days ago
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 · Rebekkah Chiam likes this.
 
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BMXcoach

Hear hear. Have had the same experience and told him "Not there yet as I believe I can keep learning to be a better coach". Still coaching him 7 years on!

15 days ago
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 · Andrew Beaven likes this.
 
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Tereza

The growth mindset is so powerful and universal. A reminder that so much takes place in the brain before physical execution and every player can benefit from a growth mindset irrespective of how well or not they are performing. I am also a Carol Dweck fan. Trying new approaches to solve problems develops our brains, challenges limiting beliefs and improves our trust in ourselves, thus raising the bar.

15 days ago
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BMXcoach

Timely reminder that as coaches, we mentor and support but leave counselling to the professionals! Really like the idea that as coaches, we should take up more new challenges.and love our own learning journey.

15 days ago
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JimBrown
Jim Brown said:

I have been following and implementing Dweck’s work for several years. I’ve used it in schools with students grades 4 to 8. I’ve implemented it with athletes. I’ve used it as a practicing counselor in counseling settings but also performance coaching / Consulting with athletes and parents. I’ve found a fixed mindset to be one of the biggest barriers for young athletes.

6 days ago
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