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Equal to the task: Women have just as much to offer the coaching industry as men | Welcome and General | ConnectedCoaches

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Home » Groups » Welcome and General » blogs » Blake Richardson » Equal to the task: Women have just as much to offer the coaching industry as men
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Emma Tomlinson, Dannielle Starkie and 5 others like this.
 

Comments (5)

  
pippaglen
Excellent article again Blake, it's great to see more and more female coaches putting there own stamp on coaching, as a multi sports coach It's taken many years to make my mark with many tears and nearly giving up, however I'm very strong headed individual and know what my capabilities are. If I need help I will ask. I'm currently working along side Englands athletics throws coach Phil Pete, coaching disability throw, I know when I go down on track this morning I will learn more. since working with Pete he has never told me I'm coaching wrong as we both have different coaching styles and ways of learning. I give praise to Phil for dedicating his time. However not all coaches are like this as I have found out over the past 8 years.
09/03/16
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 · Blake Richardson likes this.
 
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CatherineBaker
Great piece Deborah and Blake; thank you. Deborah's story reinforces the fact that coaching can be very accessible for women, be it mothers, those looking to contribute to their community, etc. I think this is one of the key messages to get across in the challenge to raise the number of female coaches. It also reinforces how rewarding it can be.
10/03/16
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 · Emma Tomlinson, Blake Richardson and 1 other like this.
 
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Maureen
Olwyn Hatton said:
I have been an archery coach now for many years, being a county coach for at least 10 years. I love being involved in educating coaches as well as archers. I find almost all archers are happy to be coached by a female coach. There are some who are plain stubborn and "un-coachable", whatever the sex of the coach. The greatest barrier I have found comes from above, from county and regional level. I have frequently been by-passed in favour of male colleagues in spite of my numerous skills and qualifications. Many senior colleagues have commented on this in the past, wondering why I have not gone up to the next level. The higher echelons seem very male dominated. After teaching A level Biology for 30 years, I am very well qualified to be a coach educator and tutor but despite all my efforts don't seem to get anywhere. It really galls to sit through a session poorly presented by a male colleague, "death by power point" etc., when I know I could do better. I also firmly believe that fast tracking an Elite Sports person is not the best way to gain a good coach. They may have excellent technical skills and competitive experience, but can they empathise with a lest skilled struggling athlete. At Elite level, they operate on Auto-pilot, often unaware of what they are actually doing. How do they teach that?
10/03/16
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 · Rob Maaye, Emma Tomlinson and 1 other like this.
 
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Arulanandam
Hi Deborah, Brilliant article and there are lots of tips and ideas in this article for men coaches. I am a tennis coach and I always willing to learn from any one who could coach me or help me to learn regardless of their agenda. Having spent many years in the private and public sector as a manager, I have now taken up tennis coaching. We all need to come out of this mind set that only men know everything. There is a valid reason why Andy hired a female coach. Knowledge is power and as long as the coach had a passion for that sport and coaching the sport with full of enthusiasm I am willing to learn form her or him. This happens in the business industry as well. Alan Sugar hired a female CEO to run his series apprentice. So, there are people up there who recognize the knowledge, skills and the experience of female coaches, managers and CEOs. You have really done well and keep on doing what you are good at and you will reach the top.Good luck and thank you for sharing your thoughts and ideas.
David
13/03/16
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 · Melanie Mallinson, Deborah Bray and 1 other like this.
 
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Deborah
Deborah Bray said:
Many thanks for your kind comments David. I wish you well with your coaching.
14/03/16
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