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Home » Groups » Welcome and General » blogs » Richard Cheetham » Deliberate practice: Planning guidelines you can use to shape your coaching sessions
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Chris Simcock, Yusuf Karolia and 6 others like this.
 

Comments (6)

  
dancottrell1
Dan Cottrell said:

I am interested in trying to tie this into non-linear pedagogy. Are you suggesting that the "learning objectives" are really teased out of the first box, with the coach suggesting/nudging the athletes in a direction? Once roughly outlined, then deliberate practice can truly take place? And, at the end of this "session", you don't tick off whether you've achieved the objectives, just that you are on the right path?

22/02/17
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cheetham

Dan - I have constructed the key elements that I believe are essential considerations. The info graphic is not a step by step guide in other words starting with commitment and finishing with eagerness., it is a recipe with all the ingredients shown. The critical aspect here is that you consider the learner, the coaching and learning environment, the stages of development, feedback and an understanding that to get better and improve coaches need to ensure that the learning is a shared process. Do you know how to improve and why? What skills do you need to develop / practice, understand and evaluate their own performance. Success is measured on an individual basis as are the aspirations - do I want to have the basic skills so I can play with friends or do I want to be the best I can be? I deliver this in a module at the University and the integration of this in practical sessions has been very insightful for all involved. With the fundamentals I focus on accuracy - don't just do the movements but get them right because the errors carried forwards will limit the individual later.

24/02/17
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 · Dan Cottrell likes this.
 
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dancottrell1
Dan Cottrell said:

Thanks Richard, though you have led to more questions than answers! I like the ingredients aspect, which helps me understand the mix of the session.
I also get the shared process. I suppose what I'm trying to understand is this:
> The questions you pose in your comment: Do you know how to improve and why?What skills do you need to develop / practice, understand and evaluate their own performance?
> How do you measure accuracy and then, how do you measure whether those skills are "learned"?
And thanks for sharing this research and development. It seems we are still learning more about learning.

24/02/17
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Mwood
Matthew Wood said:

Hi both. Thanks for sharing the original post it is an interesting read.
Dan - this may help answer your first question, I think a lot of what is 'deliberate' about practice stem from performer or individual constraints such as motivation to do well or master a task. The practice design and the manipulation of task constraints then foster an intrinsic motivation within a NLP as the performer is encouraged to explore and self organise therefore they are becoming hooked on learning not simply reproducing solutions or completing set tasks. The deliberate part of a NLP is in the doing and having a go in changing environments not necessarily the repetition or mastery of tasks that a deliberate practice approach implies.

I hope that adds something to the discussion I look forward reading more.
Matt

24/02/17
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RobChapman
Rob Chapman said:

Hi Richard,
I am interested in how you think this can be applied to a sport such as Gymnastics, where there is no game against opponents, only completing a series of moves against a set criteria to achieve a perfect score. How would you use this in a pursuit of "perfection"?

Rob

12/10/17
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cheetham

Dear Rob Thanks for your message and apologies for the delay in replying I was away delivering a session on deliberate practice in Manchester yesterday and there are real challenges to ensure it is embedded effectively in training. With DP the concepts are to ensure the quality of the practice is kept high - so periods of intense activity followed by recovery. Coaches and athletes work towards accuracy in technique and outcome with time to reflect on performance and encourage in your case the gymnast to be more and more aware of their own development needs. "I know that areas to improve on are....... and I can do this by.......". It promotes a partnership in the learning between coach and athlete. Then yesterday we focussed on how to ensure that the skill acquisition is challenging but at an appropriate level - 'stretch them - just beyond what they can do - even a small change but one that is achievable with practice". I refer to the phrase "treading water" - are people staying in the same place or is there always an opportunity included in the session to be challenged? Diligence is the attention to detail that you encourage your gymnasts to adhere to - good habits! Warm-ups, cool downs, hydration, correct kit, timing, doing the extra things well that support the overall performance goals. I hope this helps. Richard

17/10/17
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RobChapman
Rob Chapman said:

Hi Richard,
Thanks for getting back to me. You've explained it in a way I can understand, which is sometimes difficult when taking something relating to teams and changing to individuals, it is definitely some food for thought.
Rob

20/10/17
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