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Andy Edwards, Lawrie O'Keeffe and 8 others like this.
 

Comments (7)

  
liammccarthy16
Liam Mccarthy said:
Thank you for sharing this Krissi Paterson - these reflections resonate, although i couldn't put it as well as you have. I love the idea of celebrating new insights. I think developing curiosity as a first step before introducing ideas (to students in my context, anyway) is crucial to their long-term learning and engagement. Rewarding that curiosity important, too. Another great read!
22/02/16
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Quiet1
Thanks, Liam. I really like Klein's way of looking at creating insights. And for me, discovering what helps players / learners learn is really valuable for me to reflect on how I could try out those same things in own practice. Too easy to get stuck in a way of doing something, without really reflecting whether its any good!
22/02/16
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 · Andrew Gillott and Liam Mccarthy like this.
 
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JonWoodward74
Jon Woodward said:
Excellent post Krissi and links into #LoveLearning promotion..... Klein's thinking is certainly informing my own thinking, both as a coach and a coach educator. I feel the impact of collaboration is key to learning (isn't that we are doing here?!?!) and the 'risk' of tring something new, for me, underpins everything we do. Risk and Failure breeds success and development. I often use the example that as children we learn how to walk by falling down (simplified!) and you learn what doesn't work by trying new things and gaining experience. Innovation is key!!
25/02/16
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CatherineBaker
Great article and comments. Reminds me of one of my favourite quotes that we use in our business 'The comfort zone is a beautiful place but nothing ever grows there.'! Some really key themes being picked up in this discussion: how you need to get into the 'stretch' zone to continuously improve; how critical feedback is to learning and development; the best way to encourage insights (two areas of particular relevance here - your own brain, plus the importance of 'wildcards'. Starting with your own brain, ask yourself where you tend to have your moments of insights/breakthrough thinking? For some people it's the shower, for others the commute, for me it's when I go for a run - lots around how your brain makes different connections in different settings. As to the wildcard, I was recently brought into a big meeting, with people who had been working on a really important project for a long time, and who were very immersed in the details. My remit was around behavioural change, but I also acted as the 'wildcard'. Someone who can look at something with an entirely fresh pair of eyes, who has not been swimming amongst the facts, figures, and agreed way of doing things, and so can look at a problem entirely differently. This can have a huge impact in terms of a new insight into how to take things forward.); and of course the growth mindset theme that has been picked up (Jon - love the reference to walking - we use that and learning to ride a bike when trying to explain the key take home points from Carol Dweck's research and the huge body of work that has built up around application of the growth mindset). Thank you all!
25/02/16
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 · Jon Woodward, Krissi Paterson and 1 other like this.
 
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Arulanandam
David Arulanandam said:
This is absolutely brilliant article. I am a firm believer of continuous learning and that is the only way I could develop my self as coach and also continue be useful to my students and deliver my objectives. Even if everything goes well at times, still there are areas that we could improve and deliver better results. Thank you for sharing this thoughts and comments.
David
26/02/16
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andrewb62
Andrew Beaven said:
Krissi (and the "commentary team") - thanks for this post. It has certainly set me thinking!

You write "I’m not sure how often I put myself in a new context with my coaching or teaching which takes me out of my comfort zone" - perhaps Klein has a suggestion on this, as well.

One of his tools for developing a questioning mindset is to encourage others, effectively to pick their brains. I coach groups of 3-5 year olds. Even at this age (especially at this age), I will ask questions to check for understanding; and they never cease to amaze me with their perspectives on what I have asked them to do, or what they could do instead.

New contexts, from way outside my comfort zone (no, we won't be climbing the nets or rolling along the hall, as suggested when I asked about different movement skills...).

It works with senior players in 1-2-1s, as well - they might have understood an instruction differently to the way I had intended, or just have a better idea!

Going forward, I shall try to make CfU a two-way learning process.
28/02/16
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Quiet1
Thanks everyone for your comments and ideas around this. Its really valuable to hear them, and just keeps kindling the curiosity flame :)))
02/03/16
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