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Why an obsession with new drills could be hindering performance. | Welcome and General | ConnectedCoaches

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Home » Groups » Welcome and General » blogs » Nick Ruddock » Why an obsession with new drills could be hindering performance.
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Rob Maaye, David Pratt and 2 others like this.
 

Comments (5)

  
AndyS
Andy Stevens said:

An interesting piece Nick, and an approach I've come to find works well for me as a rugby coach.

Primarily I coach my son's U8's group as well as helping coach U16's and Colts as they're low on coaching staff (plus gives me an opportunity to practise my new relatively new Level2 knowledge).

It's interesting that the same mindset works for all of these age groups. Planning drills that the group can understand and perform soon gets them performing them well, and allows you to gently progress the difficulty level or add a new dimension to improve the technique until it's performed perfectly subconsciously.

We only use a handful of core drills, with variations available to allow me to progress (or regress depending on how it's going) the session. The great thing I find about this approach is when I say "Auckland Square" all the players know what's coming and what's expected and set themselves up. They might not know how it will finish, but they're running the start of the drill themselves and self-reflecting on what's working well - or what isn't!

I used to take my son to another sport (he does a few)! The coaches were very well intentioned, but 15mins to set up an overly complicated drill just lost the kids time after time.

10/03/17
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dpwatts44
David Watts said:

An England Hockey coach developer told me to think of drills as the white sauce in the lasagne. You have to start with it but that is all it is...a place to start from. A single drill or game can be used to develop lots of different coaching points. It is how the session is designed around them and how you use them to question and let the kids experiment and find solutions and skills that is important. It's reminded me to really cut back on new games/drills so the kids know the game and can focus on the learning more.

12/03/17
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NickRuddock
Nick Ruddock said:

Thanks for sharing David, nice analogy :)

17/03/17
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CLEVER-Archey
Jock Murray said:

Being an archery coach process to repeat what we do is the lifeblood and even our Olympians will spend hours a day using an elastic band to master the drills and skill that make up their shot routine. While learning our skills and drills we have a baseline of six elements that are physically based. From this baseline we can build psychological process that over lays this process it is practiced so that it becomes a completely controlled, but entirely subconscious activity with great rhythm. Without drills and skills we could not progress our athletes it is completely the life blood of our sport.

15/03/17
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NickRuddock
Nick Ruddock said:

Thanks Jock. Agreed, drills really are the lifeblood of gymnastics too, however they need not be complicated, they just need to serve a basic purpose, and in my sport, coaches often over complicate drills as they are magnetised by how 'trendy' they are as opposed to their function. What looks great might not be what is required, and in addition, coaches often copy and paste drills into their programme without understanding their value or the key coaching points.

17/03/17
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CLEVER-Archey
Jock Murray said:

I have spent the last two years simplifying our drills and skills making them into packages that are programmable to everyone and exactly as you said simple. I use a structured baseline called CLEVER Archery that absolute beginners can use but its basic principles work right up to Olympians (with additions). Its only the determined language and volume that changes over the abilities. I think that as balanced and open coaches we need to cross reference to other sports, practices, structures and coaching practices. So its great to read well written pieces such as the piece above that's content cross references what we are developing in Archery

17/03/17
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AndyP

Great tweet from legendary jumps coach Boo Schexnayder:
" Common question 'my athlete does this wrong, I need a drill to fix it.' Drills are sold in aisle 6 at Lowes. Coaches fix wrong."

10/05/17
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DavidJohn
David Pratt said:

I agree they don't have to be complicated. I too have reviewed my drills over the years simplifying them. I assessed whether it worked or not when watching them swim and often wondered why the drill didn't morph into the stroke or vice versa.
Drills have their place to learn a movement or action however these are now simplified and part of the swim set. Otherwise it can become too complicated losing the enjoyment. Also what works for one maybe doesn't work for another.
I do like scouring the Internet for drills, however it is not done to find answers. It is to find a fun drill to use at the end of a session to learn movement or how to use the water better, which my swimmers enjoy. Also I use this method to introduce a drill or particular movement to a future set.
Many of my swimmers enjoy the challenge of trying out a drill or trying to do the 'challenge' of actually doing it.

04/07/17
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