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Self Fulfilling Prophecy | Welcome and General | ConnectedCoaches

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Louisa Arnold, Elly Moore and 1 other like this.
 

Comments (7)

  
Diddyditri
Di Murray said:

Coaches need to consider their language consistently to avoid the wrong message being sent to athletes. Focusing on the positive has many benefits even when giving feedback.
Thanks for the article.

10/05/17
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 · Grant Harrison likes this.
 
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CindyBurwell
Cindy Burwell said:

Language and messages are so important! My Ice hockey playing son was told at age 12 that he didn't have good "hands" (an expression in ice hockey for skilled at puck handling) and should therefore focus on developing his other strengths, versus this weakness. My son therefore didn't practice his puck skills - as after all he wasn't good at it, and never would be. He repeatedly told himself - "I'm never going to be good at puck handling, so why bother practicing that". Fast forward a few years, and he struggled to make the top team - as his puck handling was not developed - an important skill for hockey. Had this coach helped him develop those skills, rather than tell him he was no good at it, may have had a huge impact on his hockey development and self-esteem!

11/05/17
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 · Grant Harrison likes this.
 
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JohnnyB
John Byrne said:

As coaches we must constantly remind ourselves to use positive language when teaching skills to children. One very popular mistake made by soccer coaches is asking children to use their weaker foot to pass the ball. This automatically gives the children a sense of doubt about their ability as they are using the weaker or bad foot. Because coach called it weak,there is no point in using it as its not as good as my stronger foot and I will be no good. Be careful what we say and the language or terminology we use,the impact could be very damaging in the long run.

16/05/17
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Nollzer
Val Andrews said:

Interesting stuff. I have been guilty of incorrect language. This makes me ponder if we concentrate on the athletes' positives and label them appropriately. Example, label a kid speedy, warrior, brave and no doubt the athlete will come to believe. Trick is to use good coaching language which focuses on the athletes strengths.

17/05/17
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 · Robert Ferguson likes this.
 
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CoachMarriott

Slightly off track here, but how often do coaches tell players to concentrate on eliminating their weaknesses and neglect to remind them to continue to work on the strengths that may be the things that currently make them stand out? Of course players need to broaden their skill sets, but should also try to turn their strengths into super-strengths!

Back to the main message, current thinking says that the +ve:_ve message ratio should be at least 5:1 and ideally 8:1

21/05/18
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 · Robert Ferguson likes this.
 
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Margaret88

Maybe we're ahead of the game in Olympic shooting sports.... even as an athlete (about 25 years ago!) after training (or a match) we were encouraged to write down what went well.... then what we needed to work on next time. We still do that (as coaches) and our athletes write down feelings as well as results in their training diaries - it is SO important to have those positive words to look back on - and in the athlete's words which they will understand.

22/05/18
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GrantH55

Along with what is said about an athlete is how it is said. I agree the negative consequences of misplaced humour can be significant.
"What went well" and "what could you do differently" questions tend to remove coach judgement.

22/05/18
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