Loading ...

How to coach a range of abilities within a large group | Welcome and General | ConnectedCoaches

We use cookies to improve this online community and your experience when using it. Cookies used for the essential operation of the site have already been set. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy. Click the cross to close this cookie notice. X

ad
Home » Groups » Welcome and General » blogs » Blake Richardson » How to coach a range of abilities within a large group
Welcome and General

Leave group


Add a new tab

Add a hyperlink to the space navigation. You can link to internal or external web pages. Enter the Tab name and Tab URL. Upload or choose an icon. Then click Save.

The name that will appear in the space navigation.
The url can point to an internal or external web page.
Public Group
Login to follow, share, and participate in this group.
Not a member?Join now
Rob Maaye, Victoria Graham and 4 others like this.
 

Comments (3)

  
dancottrell1
Dan Cottrell said:

Lots of interesting ideas in here. Particularly like the peer mentoring.
My experience of handicaps or restraints for better players suggests that this often has the reverse effect. The better players resent it and disrupt the session as a result.
Implicit restraints can be better. Suggest level-up plays rather can't-do plays. For instance, in netball, "I think you are good enough to score with your left hand!" and downplay right hand shots.
Not sure if the learning pyramid is any basis for working out what to do! Yet, I would suggest that allowing players more than one way to involve themselves in training is good. Some will love coaching, others will absolutely hate it. I would suggest gentle testing of this.

18/09/17
 · 
 · Blake Richardson and Keith Malone like this.
 
4.76 
 /5
Avg: 4.76 / 5 (1votes)
by
  
BarbAugustin
Barb Augustin said:

I have another bright idea. For any sport where stride/stroke length (running, swimming, rowing, etc) is applicable. Try "golf" - they have to time themselves and count their strides/strokes over a given distance (I use 25m for swimming, 50m for running) - they add their time and their count together to get a golf score - the lower the better. If you have a metronome, you can change the tempo and see what happens to their "golf" score. This can be done by any athlete of any age or any ability.

25/09/17
 · 
 · Blake Richardson likes this.
 
 /5
Avg: 0 / 5 (0votes)
by
  
Owiepob
Phill O Brien said:

Had to sit up and take notice at the mention in here of real PE. Wonderful that it merits a mention in this context but it offers so much more in terms of engaging all of differing abilities than mentioned. It's philosophy of clear and shared learning journeys with student becoming increasingly independent in managing their own learning around creative, cognitive, social and personal domains along side the development of physical competencies make it really valid in the context of this discussion. It's sister approach - real coaching is starting to emerge and get a presence as well in the apprenticeship arena and in CPD with some of the governing bodies. I've worked with the real approaches for 3 years or more and I'm a huge advocate. It's the only thing I've come across to bridge the rhetoric between theory and practice regarding coaching / educating the whoever child / athelet

25/09/17
 · 
 · Blake Richardson likes this.
 
 /5
Avg: 0 / 5 (0votes)
by