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Mind the Gap: Being Liked & Respected CAN Work | Welcome and General | ConnectedCoaches

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Home » Groups » Welcome and General » blogs » Matt Thompson » Mind the Gap: Being Liked & Respected CAN Work
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Ian Mitchell likes this.
 

Comments (3)

  
Margaret Taylor
Margaret Taylor said:

This has helped me so much. As a quieter coach with little aggression, I find difficulty dealing with the day to day business people who I let the sports hall from where I coach. The company seem to favour other groups who let the hall and I don’t want to be impolite when dealing with them. Today I hesitate to telephone and say what I really think for fear of it affecting the hire of the hall. Any suggestions would be so useful. Thank you.

9 days ago
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mwthompson
Matt Thompson said:

Hi Margaret, glad the post has been of use to you. Without knowing the specifics too much all I would suggest is to be yourself and have the confidence to challenge things in an assertive and articulate way. If you think someone is being favourable to someone else, can you provide some examples where this has been the case? When having conversations that might cause conflict, try to use concrete facts to strengthen your case and help them to see it from your point of view. There is nothing wrong with having a clear, open and transparent conversation and even if you don't agree by the end of it you will both have a better understanding of where the other wise is coming from. By doing that, there is every chance your relationship with the person or company will have strengthened by be able to have a robust chat and still be able to maintain professionalism.

9 days ago
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IanJMitchell84
Ian Mitchell said:

I love this - one of the main 'self-doubts' I have had in my coaching career to date revolve around this very issue. I don't think you have to be authoritarian or aggressive to command the respect of a group. I think knowledge, passion and people skills outweigh the need to demand respect.

I think it's very important for all coaches to remember that when new to a group, respect must always be earned and not demanded or expected because of previous achievements.

2 days ago
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