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Curiosity Didn’t Kill the Coach | Welcome and General | ConnectedCoaches

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Andrew Gillott, Catherine Baker and 5 others like this.
 

Comments (5)

  
Quiet1
Thanks for sharing this, Liam. A really good read, which I relate to. During the Sports Coaching MSc at Leeds Beckett the notion of challenging assumptions and the 'taken for granted' things kind of got me hooked on trying to make sense of things - but being comfortable with not always being able to get to the end point of making sense! I generally over think pretty much everything, but am more often now taking action when I get curious about something - read, talk about it, write, draw, try things out. And being very comfortable with the knowledge that the more I learn, the more I realise there is so much more to learn :)
26/02/16
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liammccarthy16
Liam Mccarthy said:
Thank you Krissi. I would agree - the MSc at Leeds Beckett was the starting place for all of these thoughts. Thanks for the inspiration with your blog. Keep them coming!
29/02/16
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CatherineBaker
Great blog Liam, thank you. Raises the important issue of understanding yourself as a key first step (we have it as the cornerstone of most of our programmes, following the belief that "before you can be someone you need to know who you are.") I also love the discussion around curiosity and creative thinking. When I run workshops in this area I use the well-researched construct of the operational world and the innovation or developmental world. The former revolves around rules, decision-making, procedures, routines etc, whilst the latter is where curiosity, speculation, connection making, and experimenting reign supreme. Most of us spend far too much time in the operational world, and not nearly enough time in the innovation world. The trick is to know and understand when and how to move between the two, something we love working with clients on. Great example yesterday, working through some strategy planning yesterday with an organisation within the world of sport. Brains had stopped whirring round, ideas were grinding to a halt. So first of all I suggested that everyone go for a walk/have a chat to clear their heads, and then did the 'pick up an item and write down three things about it' game. This gave us the breakthrough we needed (in this case the phrase was high quality, describing a kitchen implement!) to move on with the strategy planning....
04/03/16
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TimminsLaura
Laura Timmins said:

This is a great read Liam, and has reminded me of the importance of understanding the values that underpin my practice. It is too easy to fall into the trap of being comfortable when teaching and coaching, when this is what can prevent you from developing. This is why I really value teachers and coaches who are in the early stages of their career as often, it is a clear that great thought has gone into a session; when on the other hand, an experienced coach may repeat previous practises with little reflection on the context. Of course this a very general statement, and am not suggesting that all experienced coaches do this.

If teaching and coaching settings are more open to original thought rather than following the manual, hopefully individuals can be more curious and therefore comfortable in being uncomfortable. I think this is a true indicator of the values and attitudes of that coach, as it shows a desire to progress. As part of coach education courses, coaches should be encouraged to make those mistakes (to a certain extent!) as this is part of the process of understanding their values.

I hope that over the next few weeks we can challenge first year students to start thinking about these idea's, and encourage them to understand themselves as teachers and coaches.

25/01/17
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MayburD
Derek Maybury said:

Hi Liam, thanks. A great read. Fits in very well with the Game-Centred Approach & Self-Reflective practices you are aware we continue to promote with coaches in Leinster Rugby

25/01/17
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CMurray97

This is a great read Liam, I myself don't coach any sports but what you have said in this blog has opened up my eyes and shows how can you understand others if you can not understand yourself and how deep into your own coaching system you can reach. When I do have a chance to teach or coach which is mostly in my degree I use sessions from more experienced coaches but I like to put my own twist on the session that way the students can see what I am like as a teacher and then I can get general feedback from them on the session.

30/01/17
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