Loading ...

A Starter on the Slopes - and What You Can Learn From It! | Welcome and General | ConnectedCoaches

We use cookies to improve this online community and your experience when using it. Cookies used for the essential operation of the site have already been set. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy. Click the cross to close this cookie notice. X

ad
Home » Groups » Welcome and General » blogs » Nick Ruddock » A Starter on the Slopes - and What You Can Learn From It!
Welcome and General

Leave group


Add a new tab

Add a hyperlink to the space navigation. You can link to internal or external web pages. Enter the Tab name and Tab URL. Upload or choose an icon. Then click Save.

The name that will appear in the space navigation.
The url can point to an internal or external web page.
Public Group
Login to follow, share, and participate in this group.
Not a member?Join now
Jon Woodward, Andrew Beaven and 2 others like this.
 

Comments (5)

  
LynneWalker
Lynne Walker said:
Good post Nick which brings us all back to reality. I think that it is a really good move for all coaches to learn a new skill from a zero start point every so often. Your key coaching tips summarise what we should all be doing.
28/03/16
 · 
 · Nick Ruddock, Sara Hilton and 1 other like this.
 
 /5
Avg: 0 / 5 (0votes)
by
  
robertkmaaye
Rob Maaye said:
Really enjoyed reading that Nick. Thanks for sharing!
29/03/16
 · 
 · Nick Ruddock likes this.
 
 /5
Avg: 0 / 5 (0votes)
by
  
rneveykin
Potentially slightly off topic but I have always been intrigued by the approach taken by Ski Instructors in coaching. What you have described there is absolutely textbook, but usually what you see on the slopes is that they demonstrate and everyone else simply copies by following their tracks.

This generally goes against what we preach in England, but it seems that this method really works (Otherwise surely they wouldn't use it?). Would be interested in hearing any opinions on this :)
01/04/16
 · 
 · Rob Maaye and Catherine Baker like this.
 
 /5
Avg: 0 / 5 (0votes)
by
  
anfy
Anthea Dore said:
The idea of going back to basics works at all levels. I recently held a video clinic for (relative) beginners at bowls. They were able to look at, and self-criticise, their own deliveries and consequent problems (with a little prodding). Sitting in on the session was a recently qualified coach, who wanted to learn how to conduct the session. A few days later, he came up to me and said that, as a result, he had taken his own game back to basics and had finally sorted a delivery problem he had been having trouble with!

However, I will confess to having done an experiment with this particular group of beginners. They signed up for 5 sessions of coaching, to culminate in a "match" with other club members. For the first two sessions, they were given NO coaching (difficult for some of the coaches to cope with!) So, as far as possible, NO basics were mentioned.

The only information given was an explanation of the bias on a bowl, as this is something that is not terribly obvious to a novice. They were then set a series of different novelty games and left to their own devices to score as many points as possible. (OK, so the exercises were designed to cover different aspects of the game, but they weren't to know that ...) By moving the focus from an obsession with stance, grip on bowl, etc, and focussing purely on getting a score, the effect was remarkable. Instead of seizing up in a panic about where their feet were, and was their hand right?, etc, the majority relaxed and enjoyed the challenge! So, we had virtually no mention of the basics until session 3, by which time the group was quite happy to be "encouraged" to think about the fundamentals. The coaching team were impressed and surprised by the results, and we will be repeating this approach with the next group.

I realise that this approach may not transfer easily to other sports, but too much information too soon can result in overload!
03/04/16
 · 
 · Nick Ruddock, Andrew Beaven and 2 others like this.
 
 /5
Avg: 0 / 5 (0votes)
by
  
CatherineBaker
Great post, great comments. Roman, on yours, my children have just had a week's skiing tuition with 2 brilliant instructors. They have been skiing a few times before so are fairly proficient, but have always had large group lessons with 10+ kids. This time the friends we went with organised small group lessons, so all three of my boys were in groups of only 3 for their lessons. Result - they improved more than any other year. The question is how much is that down to the instructor, how much is it down to numbers and more individual attention, and how much is it down to their increased commitment/engagement/enthusiasm to improve? Interestingly the instructors were experienced, lovely, interested in the kids and seemed to go above and beyond. They earnt the children's respect very quickly. Like you have experienced, large group lessons for my kids have previously involved lots of following down the slopes, but this time round it appeared there was a lot more breaking things down, instant feedback, adapting from set drills, etc, alongside the usual demonstrating then following.
We all know from a coaching perspective that one on one/small groups can achieve more than large group sessions in terms of individual improvement, but the smaller the group, the more important the personalities are, and the more difficult it can be to keep it fun. Luckily for my boys, this was achieved this week!
03/04/16
 · 
 · Nick Ruddock and Lawrie O'Keeffe like this.
 
 /5
Avg: 0 / 5 (0votes)
by