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Posted in: Continuing Professional Development (CPD)

coaching education and appropriate goals for young coaches

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  • You guys can skewer me on this one. Is coaching education misdirected? We ask quite a bit of the novice coach. We ask that they level out and in America we ask for continuous education until you reach master level and then you still have triennial modules specific to age you are coaching. In all of this we have a great collection of video and much on practical knowledge (in the view of the creator). Shouldn't coaching education platforms for the novice specifically be Be fair, Have fun, Create finesse., and thats it? I would add safety and thats about it for the novice. In America we will spend a large amount of time talking drills, drills, drills... This is almost always the way it goes as our governing bodies want us to emulate these clever coaches. Almost every one is espousing a practice diminishing creativity but if you ask if they teach fake fundamentals they freak out.I have been derided in such clinics only to see change quietly later. Should we be using clinics to reach a level field of knowledge or to create structure for the young coach. Thanks for reading view less

    Ps. In american hockey you are permitted to "skip" any certification if you have played in the nhl. You are assumed a master.

     · Jon Woodward likes this.
     
  • I believe that athletes of all ages need to know what they are aimimg for to be their best but they need to be part of the process;it is not only the coach's decison. Obviously how the coach covers this is depend on the individual's age, maturity and knowledge of the sport. And currently they will have to cater for the Rio effect! Lots of budding meadllits out there. 

    Skills and drills are a big part of coaching but I feel that the expereintail learning approach is beneficial to ensure the athlete is part of the learning. Learning by doing, by making mistakes and figuring out what next is essential to the athlete learning.

    Goals are important but perhaps more focus should be on process to get to the outcome.   

     · Jon Woodward likes this.
     
  • I think your comment points at the heart of my query. You point at your thoughts on coaching children experientially while acknowledging the "lines and lectures" style still used widely. We are asking teachers to teach a free learning game with creativity held high. All the while we are still teaching these teachers in a cookie cutter fashion. I hope that makes sense. Should we be working more towards mentoring programs who would then help novice teachers to create and plan in a way much more holistic? Should we be having conferences on mentoring?Thanks for your thoughts and I hope you are doing well today. Tony L.

     
  • Thanks for the post Tony - my first comment is that the ability to 'skip' certification of former players is my biggest frustration - an expert in one field, does not make you an expert in another.

    On entry into coaching, we are all novices, though the negative connatation with the word makes it sound like a bad thing, as opposed as an opportunity to discover and develop...

    There has to be a process for coaches to understand and develop their undestanding of coaching and being a coach and often view it the same as driving test (and this may be a British view) - you need to learn and be assesed as a coach, and then go and coach in a style and way, within the parameters of being a good coach (driver). Just like driving, there are some gerat coaches and some average coaches (and some poor ones too!) that still fit within the spectrum of being able to 'drive'

    Coaching is a journey not a destination - in my own role, there are days when I am the expert (though a term I am not comfortable with) as this is defined by the peer group and those with whom I am working, and there are lots of days where I am still the novice - but willing to learn and explore

    Finally, the ability to create, and allow others to be creativity is a situation that takes a leap of faith, and a huge amout of belief and confidence in what we can do.

     
  • On 9/24/16 6:06 AM, Jon Woodward said:

    Finally, the ability to create, and allow others to be creativity is a situation that takes a leap of faith, and a huge amout of belief and confidence in what we can do.

    For others that may read this and are interested in letting the players become responsible to their game, take a deep breath , exhale and look at your players. Let them know that its time for you as a coach to let them have at it. Let your co-coaches know that its time to put the hands at their sides and keep their mouths shut. Watch, wait, listen, are they playing with clear heads?Are they cohesive,can they line up? When i do this I like to wait till there is a moment that is relevent to good play. Late in the game goal up or down. Tie with a penalty against or for. When I see that I can turn that responsibility over to the players the ownership goes up. After this we ask them what they thought? How it was to take control. What went well, what didnt? It is usually a few games into the season before I ask this of them.

     
  • Jon, thank you for your reply. I am not yet in agreement with this part of your statement. The worst coach ive known was at a high level of play. Accredited well spoken and twofaced in the locker room. Many of the coaches I deal with are capable but only know what they have been taught, and here we have a cookie cutter mentality. Tab A into slot B and so on. This is about people and thats at the heart of my question. should we be more into teaching coaches to teach people and assume that they have or will search out some of the tactical and technical aspect?

    On 9/24/16 6:06 AM, Jon Woodward said:

    There has to be a process for coaches to understand and develop their undestanding of coaching and being a coach and often view it the same as driving test (and this may be a British view) - you need to learn and be assesed as a coach, and then go and coach in a style and way, within the parameters of being a good coach (driver). Just like driving, there are some gerat coaches and some average coaches (and some poor ones too!) that still fit within the spectrum of being able to 'drive'

     
  • On 21/09/16 4:01 PM, Tony Libert said:

    n american hockey you are permitted to "skip" any certification if you have played in the nhl. You are assumed a master.

    This is a massive bugbear of mine.

    Some of the best coaches never even did the event they coach. I know one superb coach who, despite having coached a couple of athletes from small girls into international athletes, still struggles to shake off the "just a dad" badge.

    On the other hand, I know of several examples of excellent athletes who have proved to be really not so great coaches. If they are unwilling to learn themselves, they are only going to have the knowledge that their coach managed to pass on to them, and who is to say that they were succesful because of that coaching, or in spite of it?!

    Coaching a sport and performing a sport are 2 entirely different things. Some are good at both. Some are good at one. Some are good at neither.

     
  • Thanks for the comment. First I will confess that I have known several that played professionally and then coached their own children and while only one has been resoundingly wonderful all but one has been okay. One was a train wreck. Most professionals have a relative understanding of process and that is carried through for the most part. They are also looked up to and I find they don't get coached past by mom and dad. That said they are also usually stuck somewhere history and aren't current with coaching practice. Where it can be negative is the several instances where better teachers were supplanted for the "pro" who will really teach the game. This never works that way and the non-parent coach you just purged will not be back.

     
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