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Posted in: General

What have you learnt from other sports?

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  • What techniques, tips, methods have you learnt from other sports that you've been able to apply to your own coaching?

    How easy was it to integrate these learnings into your sport's coaching?

     · Jon Woodward, Blake Richardson and 2 others like this.
     
  • I've tried implementing rules from other sports into my own practices. For example, the sin - bin rule from Rugby and Ice Hockey I've implemented within my football sessions, if players kick the ball out of play they have to take a 10 second sin bin. This allows the players to learn and self correct. Additionally, I've also used a powerplay (from cricket) which is a time period that allows a team to score X amount of goals in that time period. This intensifies play and shows how players manage their emotions. 

     · Rob Maaye and Steve Price like this.
     
  • That's a really innovative approach Richard. I'd be interested to hear what benefits this has provided to the squad and how the players have responded to the techniques. Are these adult players or children?

     
  • Great question Steve, and something that is vastly under-valued and under-utilised in coaching and sport.

    I go through phases of taking ideas from different sports. As a football coach, I see lots of comparisons with other teams sports and have integrated sessions from these.

    Rugby - you can only run/dribble forward, and you can only pass backwards and or sideways. Something I wouldn't during games, but it makes players think about not only their own movement with the ball, but also how to support the players when not on the ball.

    Basketball - fast breaks and finding a 'lane' to receive the pass - very much based on the Magic Johnson/LA Lakers concept from the 1980s (showing my age a bit here) but as you win the ball find an imaginary lanr/channel to move forward

    Ice Hockey - extend the pitch behind the goals - creates new angles and position of players and can also make the game flow. If using cones for goals, you can score from either side...

    Netball - you can't move more than 3 steps with the ball. Relies on player movement and awareness of who to and when to pass

     

     

     · Rob Maaye, Andy Edwards and 1 other like this.
     
  • Hi Steve, 

    Personally when working with some high end 5-11s players they absolutely love it, and often ask for rules like the sin bin to be applied. The power play adds a lot of intensity and I see players at full throttle, taking risks but also managing their emotions well (I.e. Not just smashing it up the pitch to score in the powerplay when no one is further up the field). 

    With older players, I've done it with senior girls and it worked reasonably well. It really depends on the group and the task. When working with older or younger players they must understand the consequences of their actions and why they are taking a sin bin, because who'd really want to be stood on the sidelines?! 

    With an U18 county representative squad for boys it worked incredibly well, as they were a very self assured group and would naturally take risks and be creative, so I just manipulated the tools that they already had and linked it to decision making. 

     · Melanie Mallinson likes this.
     
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