Loading ...

Block v Random Practice: Read, Plan, Do | Welcome and General

We use cookies to improve this online community and your experience when using it. Cookies used for the essential operation of the site have already been set. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy. Click the cross to close this cookie notice. X

ad
Home » Groups » welcome and general » Videos » block v random practice: read, plan, do
Welcome and General

Leave group


Add a new tab

Add a hyperlink to the space navigation. You can link to internal or external web pages. Enter the Tab name and Tab URL. Upload or choose an icon. Then click Save.

The name that will appear in the space navigation.
The url can point to an internal or external web page.
Public Group
Login to follow, share, and participate in this group.
Not a member?Join now
Kristina Medovcikova, Nick Ruddock and 4 others like this.
 

Comments (3)

  
PaulTriCoach
Paul Smith said:
I found this interesting and liked the read plan do thread. I coach triathlon and see this applied as technique in block to acquire competence with the skill. The random practice would be from creating situations that represent an event/race to develop athlete understanding from situation awareness. The coach also needs to read plan do their skill for each athlete in the practice/race situation. Thank you for the insight and initiating my reflecting.
16/10/15
 · 
 · Melanie Mallinson and Rob Maaye like this.
 
 /5
Avg: 0 / 5 (0votes)
by
  
David Parker
David Parker said:
Very informative video and really like the read, plan, do concept. I would be really interested to hear from other coaches on how this concept or the blocked vs random practice may be applied to swimming technique develop across the four strokes. Swimming is very skill driven but it seems to me the environment is less chaotic than say in playing football.

Current swim coaching practice (certainly in the club where I currently coach) seems to be very much blocked practice. Coaching instruction is also very autocratic. Cues are using internally focused on body parts and all swimmers do the same drill at the same time. Any thoughts, examples or ideas would be greatly appreciated as I'm looking to develop my skills as a newly qualified swim coach.
12/09/16
 · 
 · Rob Maaye likes this.
 
 /5
Avg: 0 / 5 (0votes)
by
  
rogerkaye73
Roger Kaye said:

Interesting video that raises some good points. As part of the most recent Cricket coaching education I undertook we spent time debating whether what in Cricket terms we call Fixed (Block), Variable (Random) or Game Based (even more Random) was the best approach. After healthy discussion the upshot was that each has their time and place. The charts shown in the video make a compelling argument for randomising practice. Maybe an element of Block practice, excuse the upcoming pun, is useful for basic building blocks and then move on to random work to challenge the technique.
There was a graphic which stated "Better ways to track progress. Measure improvements that you see in games rather than the ones you see in practice". I understand the point but by comparing delivery in practice with delivery in a competitive situation is it not possible to gain even greater insight can be gained about a performers progress? For example if a batter cleanly hits a significantly higher percentage of balls in random practice than in a game, even if the numbers are going up from game to game, that may be an indicator that their practice could be restructured to further improve skill?

01/11/17
 · 
 · Rob Maaye likes this.
 
 /5
Avg: 0 / 5 (0votes)
by
  • :*
  • :*
  • :
 *