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How to develop a coaching philosophy | Coaching Children (Ages 5-12) | ConnectedCoaches

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Home » Groups » Coaching Children (Ages 5-12) » blogs » Blake Richardson » How to develop a coaching philosophy
Coaching Children (Ages 5-12)

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Jon Woodward, Ed Cope and 3 others like this.
 

Comments (4)

  
BarbAugustin
Barb Augustin said:
I've always had a problem with defining coaching philosophy. Is it:
- your belief about technical issues (for example, in running - your belief about the importance of clocking up the miles)
- your values (eg honesty, hard work, etc)
- your target market (eg adults, juniors)
- your belief about what you must do for the athletes (eg develop a healthy athlete who is fit for life as well as competition)
- where you want to take your athletes (eg develop to the best they can be, take them to the Olympics)
- how you work with your athletes (eg work together to set SMART goals)
- something else?
- All of the above?

I've always felt that when someone asks me about my coaching philosophy, they're expecting a one or two sentence answer. I can't possibly make it that succinct. Even one of my favourite books 'Run with the Best' by Tony Benson and Irv Ray devotes a whole page to describing their coaching philosophy.
21/06/16
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 · Melanie Mallinson, Blake Richardson and 2 others like this.
 
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Ralph
Ralph Samwell said:
"An idea is something you have, an ideology is something that has you."
23/06/16
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BarbAugustin
Barb Augustin said:
Karl Mayne posted this to The Coach and Athletic Director LinkedIn group, it may be of interest: https://thehalftimeaddress.com.au/2016/07/09/building-your-coaching-philosophy-john-wooden/
10/07/16
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Ralph
Ralph Samwell said:
As has been stated above, “it’s a journey of self discovery”, although debatably true, problem with that is, you have kids to coach. Whilst you’re busy sorting out your head, are you, can you, be an effective coach?
Probably yes, but if you don’t know yourself it’s tough to know other human mentalities and how to manage them to your best potential and theirs.
A philosophy comes from your beliefs about how life should work, and your beliefs about life for the most part come from nurture, your perception of your experience of your childhood, most of which are random events. The parent’s personalities you were brought up with, the school friends and teachers you came across, the chance accidents and events you meet. In another lifetime, you’d have quite a different personality based upon those different experiences and therefore a whole new set of beliefs of how things work.
Humans are in part a best guess machine based upon the available data you gather over your life time. And so with such a random and varied set of circumstances that make you who you are, getting to any core belief is tough and probably not your own because of such early indoctrination from outside forces such as nurture. If you attempt to delve deep into what you think you believe, you often find, many contradictions and hypocrisies. Why this is so, is mainly down to the fact that the information you’ve picked up is from many different sources, and is often with their own contradictions. That randomness and variety is the source of your incongruity (even if you’re not aware of it) as they rarely match together, as they come from many other people’s assumptions. This may also explain why, it’s a journey of self discovery; in that you’re trained, not to be yourself. You are socialised, homogenised, culturised from word Go. This may also explain why you and most of your athletes and the rest of human beings find it difficult to reach their potential, because there are so many inconsistencies, incongruences, cognitive dissonances, hypocrisies. May also be why it’s hard to define, what your coaching philosophy is? The only thing our greatest thinkers seemed to agree upon is The Golden Rule.
Sorting out what are your ideas and what are ideologies is very perplexing, which is what the quote means, “an idea is something you have; an ideology is something that has you.”
Yet another quote advises; “If your philosophy isn’t making you happy, change your philosophy.” Even then; it’s your philosophy and not necessarily the children you coach. You risk making an assumption, that’s the philosophy for them?
22/09/16
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