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Putting theory into practice: Using games-based activities to achieve psychosocial outcomes | Coaching Children (Ages 5-12) | ConnectedCoaches

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Home » Groups » Coaching Children (Ages 5-12) » blogs » Blake Richardson » Putting theory into practice: Using games-based activities to achieve psychosocial outcomes
Coaching Children (Ages 5-12)

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Andrew Beaven, Neil Irons and 1 other like this.
 

Comments (2)

  
gabriel

very good

19 days ago
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andrewb62
Andrew Beaven said:

It’s a brilliant session, and it already has me thinking about how I might adapt some of the ideas to my own coaching - quite different sporting context (cricket, with a younger age group than the Zebras), but the same psychosocial outcomes.
It’s interesting how in the videos I am seeing examples of athlete-centred coaching, TGFU, perhaps some constraints-led activities.
And yet...is the language used a barrier to grassroots coaches actually “incorporating psychosocial coaching methods into their sessions“?
How could ‘psychosocial coaching’ be made more accessible to coaches, like me, who are not sports science graduates?
Call it ‘game sense’ (I know this term has a more formal definition, but I see young players learning to understand the game and developing their own abilities to analyse the game in real time - developing game sense, to me), ‘street smarts’, even?
This really looks like “proper” coaching - creating an environment, setting a challenge and allowing the athletes to explore, and maybe giving a hint or a nudge only where appropriate behaviours do not emerge - but is there a danger that the words used to describe the coaching will get in the way?

17 days ago
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