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Why Don't You Shout? - A Fair Question? | Coaching Children (Ages 5-12) | ConnectedCoaches

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Home » Groups » Coaching Children (Ages 5-12) » blogs » Rich Bland » Why Don't You Shout? - A Fair Question?
Coaching Children (Ages 5-12)

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Dannielle Starkie, Christopher Stott and 4 others like this.
 

Comments (5)

  
EllyNetball
Elly Moore said:

I'm not a 'shouty' coach and, in my time with a team used to a previous coach who roared instructions and loudly pointed out errors in match=play and also in training, I was accused of 'not caring' whether the team won or not !!! Don't get me wrong, I will certainly input during the intervals but tend not to issue specific instructions during play as I agree with Rich and the research ... players get better when they are involved in the decision-making process and learn from the outcome, be that a success or otherwise. So if, as a coach, I'm continually issuing specific instructions to specific players in specific situations, making the decisions and (quite needlessly) pointing out errors, how will they know what to do, what decisions to make, in similar situations - especially when I'm not there?

In my experience players who have not learned, or been allowed to learn, through games-based decision-making are often much-less confident in their acquired skills and own self.

For me, it starts by ensuring the training environment is one where mistakes are allowed so learning can take place ... I hear myself use the word "explore" over and over at training sessions, empowering the players to make mistakes, reflect and discuss with their team mates ... and I'm available if they want to bounce some ideas around.

Of course, until a player is confident with any new technical skill or tactical strategy, reverting to 'comfort zone' is inevitable, especially in the more pressured, competitive match situations and I have to recognise and be satisfied with that. However, there will come a time when the 'new' skill/strategy is mastered and consistently, contextually executed during pressured situations. That, to me, demonstrates learning and, importantly, understanding has taken place and the player is capable of making decisions about when or when not to use that skill or strategy in similar scenarios ... how happy am I then!?!

06/04/17
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kraichura

I guess my only question is when or at what age (of player) should a coach move from that nudging/passive matchdays style to a more vocal/helping 'in the moment' one?

19/05/17
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Clenchiecoach
Rich Bland said:

Hi Kiran
That's a good question that I'm currently searching the answer to.
Check my latest blog which suggests I should have adapted coaching style for my u14 group.

01/06/17
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kraichura

Hi Rich,

I can't find any blogs from you about this! Do you have the link?

07/06/17
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robertkmaaye
Rob Maaye said:

Hi Kiran

I think Rich is referring to his teenagers blog that was just published. You can find a list of his blogs here https://www.connectedcoaches.org/people/Clenchiecoach/blogs

but that specific one is here https://www.connectedcoaches.org/spaces/17/coaching-children-ages-5-12/blogs/general/6808/teenagers-why-i-should-have-been-ready

Cheers

Rob

07/06/17
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 · Kiran Raichura likes this.
 
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AndyP

I suspect in field sports things are slightly different and there can be more room for input by communicating instructions, but in my sport of athletics, I suspect many of the coaches shouting instructions are doing it to make themselves look knowledgable rather than directly helping the athlete. Just my opinion...

07/06/17
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 · Barb Augustin and Rich Bland like this.
 
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BarbAugustin
Barb Augustin said:

I agree wholeheartedly with Andy Poppleton.
In my sports of swimming, running and triathlon the athletes can't really hear what the coach is saying anyway.
If their performance depends on your instructions from the sidelines, you have done them a disservice.
I reckon coaches shouting instructions are doing it to make themselves look good (as Andy said) or because they feel they have to be seen to do 'something' or they're bored and want to do 'something'.
I also worry about coaches giving athletes detailed instructions at the start of a race. In most cases, I reckon it only makes them nervous. Exceptions would be if you have a particular athlete that likes that interaction, or you've just found out something that they need to know. By briefing them prior to the race, they become reliant on the coach - what happens if you can't get there one day?

30/06/17
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