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What is your core coaching philosophy? | Coaching Children (Ages 5-12)

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Posted in: All other coaching children topics

What is your core coaching philosophy?

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  • Hello everybody,

    I'm going to start off my first post on here by asking a question. What do you think is your core coaching philosopy?

    Regards

    James

     · Richard Allen, Dan Watson and 4 others like this.
     
  • Welcome to the ConnectedCoaches community James...great to have you on board! Super first question to ask everybody. I look forward to reading the replies.

    Out of curiosity what's your core coaching philosophy?

     
  • Hi James and welcome to the site.

     

    For me it's relatively simple, if it's not enjoyable, why should they bother coming.

     · Jon Woodward, Rob Chapman and 1 other like this.
     
  • Hi James - welcome and a great first post!

    I found the graphic below on twitter as a great starting and reference point...

    My core principles are:

    - To increase enjoyment

    - To increase success (on whatever 'good' looks like)

    - To be creative and innovative in our approach to delivery and design

     · Liam Mccarthy and Richard Allen like this.
     
    Attachments
  • Good question;

    Mine is simply (and vaguely);

    • Allow players to play with freedom 
    • Challenge and allow players to be the best they can be
    • Help players the ball, love the game
    • Help players define success and what it looks like for them
    • Enjoyment!
     · Jon Woodward, Sara Hilton and 1 other like this.
     
  • Hi James,  

    Excellent question I think more coaches should answer! We all have our own philosophys. 

    Having worked for any years with this age group, (FUN) like chocolate is my favourite,  making sessions exciting enough to want to come back for more. Children learn and retain more information through fun play and  activities especially at a young age. I feel it's important to make sessions fun but also learning and enjoyable. Putting too much of a competitive spin on sessions can actually cause problems and put children / athletes off wanting to participate. In the past I have had athletes come to my sessions due to parents dropping off to go for a run and children not wanting to participate,  iv made sessions fun enough for them to want to participate and come back. Happy athletes =  happy coach + happy parent's everyone's a winner 😁 

    1. Fun
    2. Enjoyable
    3. Learning
    4. Energetic 
    5. Not over training athletes 
    6. Making sure sessions are organised sessions. 
    7. Incorporate athletes own ideas not just coaches.
    8. Non repetitive 
    9. Diversity within sessions

    Listen to what athletes want.( Athlete centered coach). 

    Come on coaches let's see more  comments. 

     · Rob Maaye likes this.
     
  • Hi James

    I find this work of Pam Richards on 'shared mental models' incredible useful in framing a 'philosophy'. Making sense of what you're about by breaking it down into technical/tactical, movement skills, physical attributes, physical attributes, psycho-behavioural skills and social skills is a useful process. With this knowledge it's then possible to select purposeful and deliberate behavioural strategies and practice design to achieve desired outcomes aligned to your philosophy.

    The 'sharing' of this is then crucial. So often does this remain in the coaches head. Finding ways the engage players, staff and key stakeholders with this mental model, so it becomes a shared one, is the most crucial step in the process. 

    If you're interested i can send over the paper,

    Liam 

     · Melanie Mallinson and Rob Maaye like this.
     
  • Welcome James - you will find much to enhance your coaching on CC. :-)

    My coaching philosophy appears elsewhere on CC, but as you asked for the 'core' -  for me it is working with the participant to aid them along their unique pathway. At this age group some of the contributions offered so far seem too deep/complex imho. David Turner has something I really, really like - enjoyment is the nub of the activity.

    Regards,

    Lawrie.

     · Rob Maaye likes this.
     
  • My coaching philosphy is quite simple - to create an environment that encourages players to learn and develop on and off the playing field. I believe it is vital that this environment is relaxed, conducive and producitve for the player in all aspects whether it's technically, tactically, physically or psychologically/socially. I believe it is important for a player, no matter what their ability, to have the opportunity to develop their skill level and understanding in a structured learning environment that constantly challenges the player while also providing both encouragement and support. I have coached on many levels, from grassroots to national, and have moulded my philosophy on what I believe produces the most productive results for both player and coach.

     · Rob Maaye and James Turner like this.
     
  • On , said:

    My coaching philosophy appears elsewhere on CC,

    The 'elsewhere' Lawrie is referring to should anyone be interested... https://www.connectedcoaches.org/spaces/10/welcome-and-general/forums/general/115/what-is-your-coaching-philosophy

     
  • Hello Everyone, 

    Thanks for all your responses! First, I apologise for not getting back sooner, I actually turned off notifications and have been knee deep in deadlines recently. Second, I just noticed that this question has already been asked on another thread, so for that I apologise also. 

    @coaching philosophy

    In general, I take a very holistic, athlete(participant)-centred approach to my practice. I believe that if you make it engaging, safe and fun, then the participant will develop, whether they intend to or not. 

    However, I genuinely think that a coach needs to have many faces, if I can call it that, and can be whatever works best for the athlete. I know some athletes that need a need a coach-centred coach and some that respond better to having some control over their own development.

    I am a sports-for-development 'evangelist' (Coatler 2007, 2015), so I certainly value the holistic wellness of the young people I work with, and sporting outcomes are secondary to me. I would never value extrinsic rewards over the health of my athlete.

    I consider collaborative learning to be more powerful than one directional instruction (tell, listen, do), but again it all depends on what the athlete needs at the time, and being creative and adaptable is fundamental to being a good coach.

    I will certainly try and be more active on here in future, so I'll look forward to hearing what you think! 

    James

     · Rob Maaye likes this.
     
  • On 21/03/16 10:21 AM, David Turner said:

    Hi James and welcome to the site.

     

    For me it's relatively simple, if it's not enjoyable, why should they bother coming.

    Interesting point. Can I ask what sort of sports coaching you do? Also, how would you approach  a high-performance athlete, if they had to be there?

     
  • On 21/03/16 11:00 AM, Jon Woodward said:

    Hi James - welcome and a great first post!

    I found the graphic below on twitter as a great starting and reference point...

    My core principles are:

    - To increase enjoyment

    - To increase success (on whatever 'good' looks like)

    - To be creative and innovative in our approach to delivery and design

    Hi Jon,

    I like the diagram and it looks like it has helped a few people on here with their practices and philosophy, much appreciated.

    A couple of questions that might get you thinking:

    • Where does my coaching philosophy come from?
    • Does my coaching philosophy match my philosophy of life?
    • Would my coaching philosophy change in different coaching scenarios?

    James 

     
  • On 21/03/16 12:01 PM, Richard Allen said:

    Good question;

    Mine is simply (and vaguely);

    • Allow players to play with freedom 
    • Challenge and allow players to be the best they can be
    • Help players the ball, love the game
    • Help players define success and what it looks like for them
    • Enjoyment!

    Hi Richard,

    I liked all of those, great answers! Have you developed that philosophy from past participation and other coaches?

    James

     
  • On 21/03/16 7:55 PM, Emma Tomlinson said:

    Hi James,  

    Excellent question I think more coaches should answer! We all have our own philosophys. 

    Having worked for any years with this age group, (FUN) like chocolate is my favourite,  making sessions exciting enough to want to come back for more. Children learn and retain more information through fun play and  activities especially at a young age. I feel it's important to make sessions fun but also learning and enjoyable. Putting too much of a competitive spin on sessions can actually cause problems and put children / athletes off wanting to participate. In the past I have had athletes come to my sessions due to parents dropping off to go for a run and children not wanting to participate,  iv made sessions fun enough for them to want to participate and come back. Happy athletes =  happy coach + happy parent's everyone's a winner 😁 

    1. Fun
    2. Enjoyable
    3. Learning
    4. Energetic 
    5. Not over training athletes 
    6. Making sure sessions are organised sessions. 
    7. Incorporate athletes own ideas not just coaches.
    8. Non repetitive 
    9. Diversity within sessions

    Listen to what athletes want.( Athlete centered coach). 

    Come on coaches let's see more  comments. 

    Hello Emma,

    I appreciate the insight into your philosophy and I share many of those desired outcomes that you have listed. I think most of us can relate to being a glorified babysitter, I often feel that parents just drop their children off with me to get a couple of hours peace. It's refreshing to hear you say that you embrace that opportunity, and set yourself the challenge of convincing them to come back. I'm absolutely driven by getting as many people into sport as possible, and it's those opportunities that can be the difference between, (cheesy phrase alert) creating a 'habit for life' and discouraging a child from sport.

    James

     
  • On 23/03/16 8:22 AM, Liam Mccarthy said:

    Hi James

    I find this work of Pam Richards on 'shared mental models' incredible useful in framing a 'philosophy'. Making sense of what you're about by breaking it down into technical/tactical, movement skills, physical attributes, physical attributes, psycho-behavioural skills and social skills is a useful process. With this knowledge it's then possible to select purposeful and deliberate behavioural strategies and practice design to achieve desired outcomes aligned to your philosophy.

    The 'sharing' of this is then crucial. So often does this remain in the coaches head. Finding ways the engage players, staff and key stakeholders with this mental model, so it becomes a shared one, is the most crucial step in the process. 

    If you're interested i can send over the paper,

    Liam 

    Hi Liam, 

    Sounds very interesting, feel free to send me that and I'll be sure to take a look on my break tomorrow. I am currently doing a phenomenological study regarding the lived experiences of sports coaches, so any offering of literature or information is always greatly appreciated.

    James

     
  • Hi everyone .. 

    This is my first comment my first forum so here we go.....

    I feel a good coach philosophy to adopt is the "strict but fair" approach, I have always been the same in all coaching that I have done over the years . Strict but fair means to me and my team and parents is that when there is work to be done we concentrate and get the task in hand done to the best of our abilities and on the other hand being fair is that you as a coach are equally like to have a laugh and a joke with the boys , because a happy and fun coach makes happy and fun environments for players to want to learn and become a better players.

    Regards 

    Dan

     · Jon Woodward likes this.
     
  • On 08/06/16 8:54 PM, Dan Watson said:

    Hi everyone .. 

    This is my first comment my first forum so here we go.....

    Welcome to the ConnectedCoaches community Dan..I hope you find it a useful experience!

     · Jon Woodward likes this.
     
  • play

     
  • I stole my philosophy from live4footy. From now on its mine, all mine.

     
  • We all construct our own life and coaching philosophy from others over time, I've heard many coaches say that they see behaviours in their participants (not just techniques) that mirror those of their own. So hopefully this focus on fun and play will rub off on your participants and we can have more future coaches that appreciate how important fun is. Not just as an additional bonus, but as a tool to engage and better the learning experience. I am interested more in community 'sport plus' projects, so fun is an essential element of the session if we want to retain participants. Some might call me a youth worker that happens to use sport as the hook (tool), but I think more research needs to be conducted on how fun can impact athletic delevelopment because I think there is something in it... It doesn't have to be one or the other. I found drills very boring and it put me off formal sports competition entirely. Physically, I have the attributes and ability to occupy a number of sports, but the formality of drills and training put me off.

     
  • My core philosophy is; “believe in EVERY kid”

     

    It comes from the Einstein quote; “Every child is a genius; it’s how adults measure their intelligence, that is the problem.”

    It comes from the Picasso quote; “every child is an artist, it’s keeping them an artist, is the problem.”

     

    The two most common questions I’ve had to say to a child in 35years of coaching...

    Who stole your confidence?

    And

    How comes I believe in you more than you believe in you?

     

    The reverse is true; “never believe a parent” they are genetically brainwashed to have unrealistic expectations and limitations on their child. Yes, you did read that right, parents limit and unlimit their child’s ability at the same time. The technical name for this is cognitive dissonance. It’s the only rational logic explanation for why they think they know better than an expert coach. What parent wants to admit, we do a better job at parenting than they do?

     

    Once you believe in their potential, your philosophical job is simple, help them find it. Know that whatever they do, it’s likely they still haven’t found their maximum potential, and if it’s our job to help them find it or be honest enough to tell them they are making the choice they don’t want to; in which case they don’t need us.

    Because the absolute definition of a coach is; “potential maximiser”. Anything less, you’re not a coach, if it’s just for fun, you’re an instructor, nothing wrong in that, but if it’s not competitive, it’s not sport.

    It also has the nice side effect, in that you now don’t have to get bogged down in journey V destination, results V performance, fun V discipline. And helps stop you having to write a list, when the question was, what’s the CORE philosophy.

     

    Why put “enjoyment” before confidence as your philosophy? We only enjoy, what we are confident in, confidence shut off the first reflex; fight-flyte, only then we have the space to enjoy. Some of my most fun sessions have still had some highly unconfident child sitting in the corner. We do what we know, when we know better, we do better, including children. Success breeds confidence, which THEN breeds enjoyment, find out what they are good at, enjoyment will look after itself, it becomes a natural by-product, not the product itself. Coaching fun sessions is lazy coaching, coaching is about “potential maximising”; although I’d choose a coach that knows how to coach fun over a coach that saps the life out of a session, with being bogged down in making sure, the kid learns something. A session based only on fun, should only be used, to have a complete break from the competition pressures or as an introduction for beginners.

     
  • I never asked you to question my philosophy, or undermined my practice. If you want my personal opinion though, you're provocative ramblings sound like utter nonsense.

    There are many coaches out there that develop sporting performance without a competition at the end, and after seven years of observing, practicing and studying coaching, and being scrutinised by those that write your 'sports coaching' day courses, I can safely say that your definition is unhelpful, a step backwards, and insulting to many practising coaches. To be fair to you though, many 'old school' coaches have the same difficulty with keeping up with the professionalisation of sports coaching, so I wouldn't let it eat you up too much. In my view, a coach that can't make their session fun IS LAZY, and politely as I can be, also ignorant to the fact that fun is increasingly becoming a developmental tool, not just a hook for participation. Sometimes fun is the ONLY reason children will participate in anything, and confidence only then develops as participation increases. You need a starting point. Some children have 0 confidence. If that first sessions doesn't seem like an enjoyable experience, then you will never have the opportunity to build anything. The role of the sports coach has changed, whether you like it or not. Hairdressers are now being trained on how to spot domestic abuse. Police are now trained on how to deal with Internet crime. Occupations change in the dynamic world we live in. What you are describing was actually called a 'trainer.' A person that trained an athlete or group of athletes for an event. We coach. A coach will dabble in many different disciplines and environments, and often has to make their sessions fun first and foremost because the participants neither have to come back or get paid to come to the sessions. Confidence is certainly a bi-product of sport, but it can also shatter confidence, so it can work both ways. A good coach understands the real potential of fun, nobody will ever tell you Ralph, in the 21st century anyway, that it has to be no fun or no development.

     
  • They are not ramblings except via your personal opinion and interpretation, “ramblings and utter nonsense” are a highly unprofessional comment, not worthy of this site and your high standards within your stated philosophy. I seemed to have inadvertently pressed a button you have. I can back up all my comments with current University research. I didn’t question your philosophy, I gave mine, if mine happened to contradict yours, that’s life, unless you want everyone to agree with you or never contradict you or have a differing opinion?

    You make gross assumptions about eating and age, both of which are wrong.

    I totally agree with you about fun, there’s no problem there.

    I maybe rambling but you’ve not specifically said from the many things, which is the backward step. I presume it’s the “Believe in every kid?” As the whole of my “ramblings” are based on this.

    I’ve seen modern coaches remove all competitiveness within their sessions and councils remove all sports and competitive games from schools.

     
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