Loading ...

Coaching Successful Performance to Develop Decision Making | Coaching Youth (age 13-18) | ConnectedCoaches

We use cookies to improve this online community and your experience when using it. Cookies used for the essential operation of the site have already been set. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy. Click the cross to close this cookie notice. X

ad
Home » Groups » Coaching Youth (age 13-18) » blogs » Ceri Bowley » Coaching Successful Performance to Develop Decision Making
Coaching Youth (age 13-18)

Leave group


Add a new tab

Add a hyperlink to the space navigation. You can link to internal or external web pages. Enter the Tab name and Tab URL. Upload or choose an icon. Then click Save.

The name that will appear in the space navigation.
The url can point to an internal or external web page.
Login to follow, share, and participate in this group.
Not a member?Join now
Lee Adamson, Jordan Bird and 10 others like this.
 

Comments (7)

  
CatherineBaker
Excellent. Really agree with this. Human nature often to focus on what isn't working but looking to the 'bright spots', analysing why they worked, and distilling that down and replicating is a very effective process.
16/05/16
 · 
 · Rob Maaye and Ceri Bowley like this.
 
 /5
Avg: 0 / 5 (0votes)
by
  
CeriBowley
Ceri Bowley said:
Thanks Catherine. Would like to think this approach also encourages more reflective athletes who are 'thinkers' rather than being over reliant on their coach being a 'fixer'
16/05/16
 · 
 
 /5
Avg: 0 / 5 (0votes)
by
  
garyfowler
Gary Fowler said:
Great post Ceri. This is something I have noticed more and more recently when assessing younger coaches. They have normally gone through a grassroots or L1 award that has a huge focus on how to correct rather than how to praise success. Often this comes from assessors needing to see that the candidate can identify a coachable moment, intervene, correct, rehearse etc as you laid out. However highlighting good practice is as important to team mates as it is to the individual. Asking the player why they made the choice to perform the move they did can help them become more aware of the cues (great pt of player moving to coach) that allowed for success, hence allowing a level of consciousness leading to improved repetition. The other advantage to highlighting success means a coach can question team mates on what they saw this player do, leading to a good kind of copying. As you say, no 2 situations are the same, and 2 players can make entirely different decisions, so I often ask another player, would they have done something differently than player A did, or could they show us an alternative the next time they find themselves in a similar (not identical) situation. I definitely find celebrating a successful process and outcome is a great type of peer learning too, one and helps things stick is a young players mind too.
17/05/16
 · 
 · Elly Moore and Duncan Beattie like this.
 
 /5
Avg: 0 / 5 (0votes)
by
  
Sharon
As a level 1 archery coach we praise a good shot and ask the novice to remember how it felt, as it is crucial to have your muscles/skeleton in the correct position for you. Being able to repeat the action every time is archery. As a coach I concentrate on the grouping of the majority of arrows shot rather than the stray, often the novice will click that the stray arrow was the one which they twisted their hand out of alignment. It's very easy for a novice archer to become discouraged. So as a club we have our own badge awards which recognise small steps of personal achievement/improvement.
18/05/16
 · 
 · Rob Maaye and Ceri Bowley like this.
 
 /5
Avg: 0 / 5 (0votes)
by
  
sgreen
Simon Green said:
You make some great points, and I think all sports and all coaches have these issues. I have spent quite along time looking at ways of developing players, and sessions designed to get the players to firstly make the decisions, secondly make mistakes, and thirdly to operate in an environment where its ok to " try something " in training.

The best tool I have found is Ecological dynamics, using the constraints led approach, its along the lines of adaptive games but with constraints, in order to achieve the desired outcome. The most important thing is me as a coach changing my coaching philosophy, not the players doing what I " teach" them, its about letting the players take the lead and really make decisions under pressure.

Most of the coaching is in small sided games but can be done in medium and full size scenarios, but with a technical development area running along side the games area where we pull out 4 -6 players to look at a technical issues related to the main game, where they spend max 5 mins in the area focussing on the skill but still under some pressure.

This keeps all the coaches occupied and you can rotate round if you have several coaches, but continually rotating players for a short time allows you to hone techniques and put them back into the game so they then use them in the game and the transfer and retention of information is much better.

The main game is just playing at a tempo but with constraints on things like individual players, sub groups, the attack the defence, the pitch size the type of equipment being used, naturally the ground conditions, and weather can become natural constraints themselves depending when your training, all these mirror real game conditions. The most important thing is its player led you ask questions, let them make some of the rules, constrain the game where you lead them to try or do certain actions in the game or position on the pitch, you may alter the scoring system to encourage certain behaviour in certain areas etc. The key lies in encouragement to make mistakes, don't intervene as much, they will learn which behaviour, skill, tactic works best in certain areas against different styles of play, attack, defence numbers. counter attack etc you merely ask guided questions and help them decide which risk gets most reward and they learn to think on the pitch where you cannot be.

In my humble opinion, and im still developing new constraints and learning myself, coaches tend to often feel they have to tell the player the best way, and drill it so both can see improvement in the session, also an outside constraint could be watching parents, however the retention by the player going forward I would suggest is often limited and they just do it because they learn this delivery style at school and club. when you run game sense with constraints you say less but players ownership and invention is better, they retain the information, and begin to develop a series of pictures of understanding, and are able to recognise whats is required when as they now scan more and adapt quicker.
There is a lot more to this its only a snapshot, but I encourage people to self reflect, I thought the joharis window article was spot on, we need to look at ourselves as coaches to change if we want to get the players to change, our governing bodies can produce all the technical systems etc they want but its the grass root coaches that ultimately develop the youth and the talent pool we build, put in at 12 what we currently develop at 18 and we have different players, who are engaged more rounded, accountable, and more comfortable and valued individuals, with greater self esteem, will you still be the same coach ? take the journey on !!
22/05/16
 · 
 · Ceri Bowley, Cyril Yates and 3 others like this.
 
 /5
Avg: 0 / 5 (0votes)
by
  
GMEvans
Gareth Evans said:

Good and interesting read Ceri.

Would you suggest that the way in which coaching process is utilised (Welsh way) should be looked at? You mention within here in regards to the individual and praising through the game, should this be done a lot more during training sessions too? Whether gaining an understanding of the why they did something to praise or to learn from unsuccessful situations. A lot of sessions within courses are aimed at stopping the whole practice and going through the coaching process for all players to see and hear even if were not involved in the moment.

From personal experience a more individual approach has worked better for myself as a coach and the player within the sessions and games. Gaining more understanding of the players thought processes, current knowledge and understanding and therefore can aid the individual better for the present and future planning for him.

For me a lot more individual focus within your team structure is needed to develop players?

08/02/17
 · 
 
 /5
Avg: 0 / 5 (0votes)
by
  
AndreaCJ

Great post. I am a Netball coach and we are trying to move away from hand holding and instead get our players in the club to be more reactive on court and take more ownership of the decision making in order to be able to adjust to all the different scenarios they come up against from opposition. We always have team tactics and game plans ready to take into each game and sometimes these plans are worked out by the opposition but the team continue to try and execute the same thing despite it no longer being effective. We are trying to get them to have the confidence to change it up. I can see the players look to the bench for answers, but we can't be on court doing it for them, they need to be able to find the answers for themselves quickly and under pressure as the game is very fast paced. So much work to do in this area but when they get it right it will massively improve their game.
Something else that's helping us is video game analysis and getting the players to self evaluate. They watch the video of each match and do self evaluation and they often see where they could have made a better decision, both individually and as a team. It gives them clear visuals of the different scenarios too and they are definitely starting to react to this in a positive way.

15/02/17
 · 
 · Elly Moore likes this.
 
 /5
Avg: 0 / 5 (0votes)
by