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Help or hindrance: The use of video analysis to aid player development | Embracing Technology | ConnectedCoaches

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Home » Groups » Embracing Technology » blogs » Blake Richardson » Help or hindrance: The use of video analysis to aid player development
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Rob Maaye, Jon Woodward and 5 others like this.
 

Comments (10)

  
JonWoodward74
Jon Woodward said:
Excellent post Blake ( as always!!) and thanks to Richard too! I am a big advocate of learning technology and 'video' usage.

My thoughts and considerations are:

- always practice with the technology first - it takes time to get the 'picture' you want
- don't take the video capture as the be all and end all of analysis - looks at other sources of data and understand the 'story' behind the performance - why is the outcome the way it is (e.g. injury, weather, stage of development)
- always get the athlete to look at the video too - self understanding and correction can have a big impact that being told - and creates a thinking player - as a coach you are creating an environment of learning, it doesn;t mean you have to be the one telling that, merely providing the platform...
- film from different angles to get an all round view - if you look at the same thing the same way, you only ever see the same thing (keep an eye out for a future blog on this coming soon....)
25/02/16
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SarahBennett
Sarah Bennett said:
Thank you for the post, it is interesting reading about the use of technology in other sports. Interestingly in my sport of golf, very few videos are actually taken on the "playing field" The majority of video analysis are taken away from the golf course which in my opinion only tells a minute part of the overall story. There are a number of elements to consider which can only be seen during the competitive environment or course which includes the pre event work. The use of video during an event is not allowed but this is why it is vital for the coach to watch a player at elite level during their chosen event.
From a club level, I would like to see more coaches expose their clients to on course lessons where huge changes can be made with less technical input.
26/02/16
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JonWoodward74
Jon Woodward said:
Hi Sarah - that is a great point around the analysis of practice versus competition. The analysis and correction/development in practice can be manipulated easily to improve performance, but it is the moments when that skills, collection of skills, movement, etc. is needed the most, when analysis should take place - but as I mentioned, the awareness of the 'story' behind the outcome is crucial.
01/03/16
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Diddyditri
Di Murray said:
Hi

I am new to the group and picked up on this entry. So firstly , thanks for sharing this.
I am a triathlon coach and I use video analysis across all the disciplines of the sport in many ways.
I can look at technique, tactics and feed this back instantly , which at times is useful.
I also use video from the tablet to demonstrate what the group are going to do next as demonstrating a sculling drill dry side isnt always the best visual aid for the athlete.

And I am looking at the apps and websites suggested now from this group now..
09/03/16
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Blake
Hello Di. First of all, welcome aboard. I am sure you will find ConnectedCoaches a useful tool, providing some valuable insight and the chance to swap ideas and ask questions if you need some advice. And thanks for leaving a comment. The more people comment under stories, the more it will stimulate further interaction, the greater mix of ideas and the more vibrant the debate. Video technology is such a simple means of providing valuable information, and all the coaches I have spoken to say their athletes love it when they make use of their iPad or video camera in sessions. Simple but very effective.
09/03/16
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LawrieOK
Many thanks for this post - really interesting and useful information for a technophobe; this an area of my coaching I would like to develop, so your input is greatly appreciated. :D
12/05/16
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walterggreen3
Walter Green said:

My experience may be slightly different - first I am from the United States, second I train fencers, some of whom are strong competitors on national points lists. Most of them are of the computer native generation, that is to say the children who have grown up with computers. I routinely film bouts for analysis in the practice session, and that gets good engagement and is very valuable. I have used the application Coaches Eye to highlight body mechanics issues on a one on one level, and that is generally successful. However, even sending my athletes to You Tube to watch a selected bout or fencing lesson by another Master runs into the "I can't figure out how to find it" problem. We have used an online secure video sharing service to review individual bouts with very low reported viewing, again "can't figure out how to use it," and no use of the self-assessment sheet I provide for athlete use. We tried using an online ladder, and never achieved any reasonable participation in spite of awards for ladder success. Some of this is the load my school age fencers carry with 5-6 hours of homework every night (unfortunately this is a bright lot who take the challenging route through our school system). Some is the idea that the sport starts and stops at the gym door (most fencers do not have a background in school athletic teams and lack the sport equals a lot of work before and after regular practice ethos). Some is undoubtedly that mine is a community based club with no real ability to discipline non-performers. But some is simple technological illiteracy, fueled by the ease of using an ap for everything.

10/11/16
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Emily_P
Emily Perry said:

It's great that technology is so readily available to coaches now. I started out filming games on my iPad (bought a cheap tripod and iPad mount) using coaches eye app. All very cheap and user friendly.

I don't like the idea of using it to collect 'evidence' all of the time. It becomes a tool used to monitor and watch their every move. Balance it with just providing footage for the, to watch and analyse themselves rather than reducing every performance to numbers

31/03/17
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Leedavie
Lee Davie said:

Thanks for the great blog, I can relate to a lot of the comments above.
I purchased a GoPro for this past year with a view of using the chest mount to allow me to capture different angles in both drills & games, but as Jon mentioned previously you need to practice using the technology. The GoPro records in extremely file sizes so you need to convert & shrink them before they can be of use, which has taken a lot of time.

I found it very beneficial this year to pair everyone up on our team this year and assign them quarters of the game to either scout or evaluate. They then had to present their findings to the team during the film session, this then led to everyone on the team taking more ownership of the scouting report & post game evaluation. It's definitely something I will be building on in the future.

03/04/17
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ShaunParker
Shaun Parker said:

This is a good post and something that the swimming club I coach with is currently examining.

For me technology has benefits in that it can used to visually demonstrate to participants where there is room for improvement relating to such things as technique and strategy.

I do think that in order to get the best out of video capture you need to be recording and reviewing on a regular basis otherwise the participant could forget what they have seen. The downside of reviewing on a regular basis is that you need the available resources within your club to do this and the coach needs a window to undertake the review with the group and/or individual.

Choosing the right equipment (video/playback), methods for storing equipment, child safety, securely storing the content and deletion policies all need to be examined plus club documentation updated to encompass such things. So for me there is quite a bit of work to be undertaken even before you get to the point of videoing a participant.

For each sporting body I do feel there needs to be clear guidance on the use of video equipment, recommendations of what to buy, schemes to assist clubs keep costs down etc.

In addition to this and depending on the data/measurement undertaken such information can be very useful at improving technique and training sessions. I am definitely in favor of technology as it can certainly assist coaches and will in my opinion be used more frequently as more and more people and clubs embrace this.

16/05/17
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