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How a disabled American football coach is bucking the trend | Inclusive Coaching | ConnectedCoaches

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Home » Groups » Inclusive Coaching » blogs » Blake Richardson » An iron Will: How a disabled American football coach is bucking the trend
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Rob Maaye, William Babbington and 3 others like this.
 

Comments (4)

  
wbabbington
Great read Blake, thanks again for asking me.
06/10/15
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IanMahoney
Ian Mahoney said:
I am a disabled athletics coach, using a wheelchair for my safety (I have Myotonic muscular Dystrophy) None of the athletes I coach bar one have never seem me run. I used to and started well before they were born. It tool me a long time for the athletes to realise that I have a lot of knowledge whether I was in a wheelchair or not. I found the best way was to talk to the athletes in how they were feeling and use feel. felt. found. I know how you feel, I felt the same way but found 'blah,blah.blah. Dropping hints along the way that I was and athlete and ben through all the training they are doing now. I am now a well respected and well liked coach, The best thing is sometimes the athletes ask for my advice first, before referring to their lead coach.
There are many courses on sports coach for disabled athletes but so far I haven't fond on for disabled coaches ..... have I missed any?
23/06/16
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Blake
Thanks so much for that reply Ian. I will be posting a follow-up with Will shortly, which includes a video of him coaching at Leeds Academy of American Football and discussing why being in a wheelchair should not deter you from becoming a coach.
23/06/16
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IanMahoney
Ian Mahoney said:

A new development has now opened up for me. Feedback from distance runners was they thought the training a coach was given them was beneficial to them. Because of my 26 years of first hand experience of distance running (before forcing to retire due to my genetic disability (Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy) preventing me to walk unaided and kept falling over) I have been given full control over the distance athletes training/racing both at the club and at home. As the original article pointed out, being in a wheelchair does not prevent you from becoming a great and well respected coach, if what comes out of your mouth is knowledge. being a former athlete I know what trials and tribulations the athletes are going through ( I went through the same things) if you make the sessions both fun as well as effective, your 'charges' warm to you. keep coming back and listen to you, And the best thing (if they have a good race) the 3 words "Thank you, coach" makes it all worthwhile. On another question on CC. I give one point of advice at a time, when a habit is formed (30 days) and becomes second nature (60 days) I move on to next point. NGB has provided technical models and On Track 4 (4 points) cards from safety to feed back. They in valuable to get the main coaching interventions across WITHIN 30 SECONDS! Lesson number one in all Sports Coach UK workshops.

15/06/17
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